Literature


literature

Literature embodies a vision of life. For those who wish to explore the perennial themes of human experience, the study of literature is an essential part of an education. The University faculty holds that a close reading of great literary works imparts wisdom and is one of the modes of perceiving truth; that literature is best understood not only in relation to theology, philosophy, and history, but also as synthesizing and ordering the insights of these modes of knowledge. Literary studies special interest in perspective, form, tone, nuance, setting, wit, and irony goes far in shaping a subtle intelligence that appreciates the complexity and fulsomeness of human experience.

The University courses in literature introduce students to the classics of the West so that they may better understand themselves and their world by reading what the best authors have thought about the most important questions—questions about human purpose, the relationship between God and the human person and between man and woman, the foundations of knowledge, and the basis of human community. Thus, in the core classes we read the most ambitious and comprehensive authors—Homer, Aeschylus, Virgil, Dante, and Shakespeare; we listen in on the great conversation between them. The courses in the major sequence build upon the study the classics of the Western literary tradition, but students also take classes organized around specific periods, genres, and authors so that they acquire a deeper knowledge of historical development, literary form, and a single great mind’s full vision. In addition, courses in the major introduce students to the most important authors of English and American literature.

Explore the Literature Program

The Literature Department seeks the advancement of human culture, the promotion of dialogue between faith and reason, the formation of men and women in the intellectual and moral virtues of the Catholic faith. The Department seeks to aid in the formation of men and women who can read insightfully, appreciate deeply and understand clearly; as well as, write skillfully to express, explain, argue and persuade.

The University courses in literature introduce students to the classics of the West so that they may better understand themselves and their world by reading what the best authors have thought about the most important questions—questions about human purpose, the relationship between God and the human person and between man and woman, the foundations of knowledge, and the basis of human community.“One writes only half the book; the other half is with the reader.”

-Joseph Conrad

1.  With the best human minds, journey through time from the Iliad and the Odyssey through Medieval Literature, Shakespeare, Shakespeare in Performance, Eighteenth Century, Romanticism, Early Modern Literature, Modern Literature to 20th Century Literature.

2. Present and former Literature majors and minors fill many important posts at Ave Maria including: Resident Advisor, Newspaper editor. Many appear in the annual Shakespeare in Perfomance production on Campus.

3. Many Literature majors work part time as tutors in the Writing Center on Campus.

In addition to the core curriculum, literature majors take the following courses LITR 205 Medieval Literature

LITR 206 Shakespeare

LITR 307 Early Modern Literature

LITR 309 Romanticism

LITR 310 The Novel

LITR 311 Eighteenth Century Literature LITR 411 American Literature

LITR 412 Twentieth Century Literature LITR 490 Senior Seminar: Literary Theory

See the Academic Catalog for course descriptions

Literature is a great program for those who love the classics and want to spend their college years studying great works of literature and the language behind them. Students who have earned a degree in Literature might end up working in many different careers, from writing to teaching to academia.

Literature Majors and Minors understand life, and express themselves clearly so others will understand. These abilities come from confronting the literary efforts of the best human minds from across the centuries. No Major or Minor other than Literature brings the full range of human experience so clearly into focus. In every field of endeavor, these qualities of understanding and expression bring Literature Majors and Minors to the front where they can be heard.

Examples of career possibilities include the professions where understanding and expression are most useful including: Business, Law, Teaching, and many others.

 

Click on the following link to view the top ten careers with a Literature or English degree http://www.catalogs.com/info/bestof/top-10-careers-with-an-english-degreeExternal link

Christopher Alexander, Ph.D.

Instructor of Literature and Director of the Writing Center
Education: B.A., English Literature, University of Dallas,; M.A., English Literature, University of Dallas; Ph.D. (Candidate), English Literature, University of Nevada.
Office: Canizaro Library 169
Phone: (239) 304-7894
Fax: (239) 280-1637

Deana Basile Kelly, Ph.D.

Instructor of Italian and Literature
Education: Ph.D., Italian Literature and Linguistics, University of Toronto, Canada; M.A., Italian Literature and Culture, Boston College, Massachusetts; B.A., Political Science and Italian Studies, University of New Hampshire, New Hampshire
Office: Henkels 3020B
Phone: (239) 304-7188
Fax: (239) 280-1637

Travis Curtright, Ph.D.

Chair of the Department of Humanities and Associate Professor of Humanities & Literature
Education: B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Dallas
Office: Canizaro Library, 161A
Phone: (239) 280-1612
Fax: (239) 280-1637

Blanford Parker, Ph.D.

Professor of Literature
Education: B.A., Cornell College; Ph.D., Harvard University
Office: Henkels 2045
Phone: (239) 280-2433
Fax: (239) 280-1637

Michael Raiger, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Literature
Education: B.A., The University of Iowa; M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., New York University
Office: Henkels 2046
Phone: (239) 280-1694
Fax: (239) 280-1637

Lylas Rommel, Ph.D.

Chair of the Department of Literature and Associate Professor
Education: B.A., M.A., (English), University of Kentucky; M.A., (Greek), Loyola University of Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., (Literature), University of Dallas
Office: Henkels 2047
Phone: (239) 280-1610
Fax: (239) 280-1637

John Roy, Ph.D.

Instructor of Literature
Education: B.A., English, Columbia College; M.A., Linguistics, Columbia University; M.Phil., Linguistics, Columbia University; Ph.D., Linguistics, Columbia University.
Office: Henkels 1035
Phone: (239) 304-7826
Fax: (239) 280-1637